Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software

Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software

Such an awesome book!

Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software walks the reader through the development of modern computer systems from the beginnings of binary codes, through digital logic theory, to assembly language and higher level languages.

The progression is so well developed, and the writing so easy to follow, that the reader can casually develop a complete understanding of the foundational building blocks of complex processors and computer systems.

Bypassing Captive Portals

Do those pesky captive portals and acceptable use policies torment you?

My interest in circumventing these barriers to internet access was piqued recently in 2600 Volume 33, Number 3: “Captive Portal Puzzle at Sea”.

This will definitely require further research…

Lessons from DEFCON 2016 – Bypassing Captive Portals

Please see my SSH Tunneling post as well

 

MOV Before You JMP

Years ago I was doing a school project that required programming a microprocessor. For some strange reason, my partner and I decided to write our firmware in assembly.

Although we made a lot more work for ourselves by doing so, I have since realized what a valuable experience this was.

This first occurred to me when reading the shellcoders handbook, which makes it very clear that serious and sofisticated hacks are performed by those who understand software at this fundamental level.

The Autumn 2016 edition of 2600 magazine, volume 33, number 3 has confirmed this idea yet again in the article “MOV before you JMP”.

I guess this means I should finish reading the shellcoder’s handbook and RE4B!

Freedom of Thought

One of the most influential books I have ever read was “As a Man Thinketh”, by James Allen.

As discussed in this 2600 article, one’s thoughts are their own. However, with the constant pressure from outside influence (i.e. 24 hour news and media), the ability to control and qualify the input is an important skill.

As with any input, if not properly validated, it has the potential to wreak havoc on a system.

Don’t just take free thought for granted. Understand the power of influence, and push yourself to be the master of your own mind.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Die_Gedanken_sind_frei

 

The Top Ten Reasons Why Hackers Should Get a HAM Radio License

2600 Magazine, Volume 33, Number 2: “The Top Ten Reasons Why Hackers Should Get a HAM Radio License” has inspired me to get a HAM radio license!

 

#9 Echolink is where the internet meets radio… kind of cool.

The big takeaways, however, are digital modes, packet radio, AX25, and mesh networking.

Basically high powered wireless networking!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMPRNet

http://www.hamstudy.org/

http://www.arrl.org/

http://www.broadband-hamnet.org